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Rule 2: Presiding Judge

Rule 2. Presiding Judge

Sec. 1. Presiding Judge.

The Court, at its meeting on the fourth (4th) Wednesday in August of each year, shall elect a presiding judge to serve for a period of one (1) year. The presiding judge shall be elected from the members of the Court by a majority present and voting.

The presiding judge may be removed by a two-thirds vote of the members of the Court, with or without cause.

Sec. 2. Presiding Judge Pro Tem.

The Court, at its meeting on the fourth (4th) Wednesday in August of each year, shall elect a presiding judge pro tem to serve for a period of one (1) year. The presiding judge pro tem shall be elected from the members of the Court by a majority present and voting.

The presiding judge pro tem may be removed by two-thirds vote of the members of the Court, with or without cause.

If at any meeting the presiding judge is not present, the presiding judge pro tem shall preside. If the presiding judge is recused with respect to a matter, the presiding judge pro tem shall act as presiding judge with respect to such matter.

Sec. 3. Presiding Judge —Duties.

In addition to the duties and responsibilities set forth in Chapter No. 356, Public Acts of 1979, as modified by Chapter 208, Public Acts of 1995, the presiding judge shall preside at all meetings of the Court and at trials. The presiding judge shall rule upon the admission or exclusion of evidence. However, the presiding judge's ruling upon the admission or exclusion of evidence may be appealed to the full Court.

The presiding judge and only the presiding judge shall be the spokesperson for all matters pending before the Court, except that if the presiding judge is recused with respect to a matter pending before the Court, the presiding judge pro tem and only the presiding judge pro tem shall be the spokesperson for the Court with respect to such matter.

After the trial of any matter the presiding judge shall write or shall designate a member of the hearing panel that heard the matter to write the majority opinion. Any member of the hearing panel that heard the matter may write a concurring or dissenting opinion.

The presiding judge shall have such other duties and responsibilities as are necessary in fulfilling the office.

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